Page 18 - 2017 Washington State Access to Justice Conference
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Dominiqué Jinhong is an Industrial Appeals Judge for the Washington State Board of Industrial Insurance Appeals. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Puget Sound, and her Juris Doctorate from Seattle University School of Law in 1998. She is a fellow of Leadership Tomorrow (2013), the WSBA Judicial Institute (2012), and the Mendoza School of Business at Notre Dame. Prior to her appointment to the Board of Industrial Insurance Appeals, she was a Special Assistant U.S. Attorney with the Social Security Administration, an Army Judge Advocate, a county prosecutor, and a senior civil rights litigator with the City of Seattle handling the Seattle Police Department’s high pro le Section 1983 Civil Rights suits in state and federal court. Before becoming a lawyer, Dominiqué was a potter and banker. She currently serves on several boards and commissions and started two non-pro t pro bono legal clinics.
Claudia Johnson works to improve how legal non-pro ts and courts provide services to low income communities and how those without lawyers obtain the remedies they need from multiple venues. Claudia has been an innovator for 21 years starting the lawyer of the day project in eviction court in San Francisco, the Language Access Project at CLS, Philadelphia. Claudia served in the LEP Court Standards approved by the ABA. Claudia served on the working group that released the Best Practices on E- ling for SRLs published by LSC. Claudia reviews articles for the NCSC Future Trends in State Courts Journal. She is a member of the WA State ATJ Commission Technology group, and guest blogs with Richard Zorza on http://www.accesstojustice.net and Pro Bono Net’s Connecting Justice Communities blog, http://www.connectingjusticecommunities.com/ Her work on online forms was recently highlighted by the NY Times in 2016: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/01/opinion/legal-aid-with-a-digital-twist. html?_r=0. Claudia started her legal career as a Skadden Fellow in Philadelphia. She is has 3 degrees from UC Berkeley and her law degree from University of Pennsylvania Law School.
Dr. Karen A. Johnson is an executive coach, workplace culture strategist, and community servant leader. She is an accomplished change agent whose gifts and talents are sought out in government, nonpro t, business and faith-based markets. Karen has an extensive portfolio of community service, including leadership roles with the Olympia-Capital Centennial Rotary Club, Thurston Thrives, the YWCA of Olympia, Thurston County Media, and the Black Alliance of Thurston County. She is also a Precinct Committee Of cer and leads the statewide effort to amend Washington’s use of deadly force law. Karen lives in Olympia. Her life work is to advance liberty and justice for all.
Doreen Keller, Ed.D. is an assistant professor and the secondary coordinator of the Master in Teaching program at Whitworth University. After teaching in the Mead School District for eleven years as a secondary English Language Arts instructor, AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) teacher and site coordinator, and journalism advisor, she began teaching courses in higher education. She joined the Whitworth faculty in 2013. Her areas of specialization include best practices in teacher education, especially culturally responsive pedagogy and classroom management. Her research interests include place-based education, teacher candidate inter-cultural readiness, and edTPA preparedness.
Lillian Kaide is the Seattle University Frances Perkins Fellow with the Unemployment Law Project. The focus of her work is to serve the immigrant and refugee community through direct representation, advice, and community outreach to connect all community members to ULP’s services. She is a graduate of Seattle University School of Law where she was extensively involved with the Future Prosecutors for Social Justice and the Seattle Journal of Environmental Law. She is a recipient of the Order of the Barristers. Connect with her through email at lillian@ulproject. org.
Fleur Larsen is Co-Founder of the HR & Equity Consulting Firm, a human resources partner grounded in a commitment to diversity and equity, and Principal at Fleur Larsen Facilitation. Fleur started facilitating 18 years ago on challenge course programs with youth and adults. Currently she works with several companies utilizing challenge and experiential facilitation with corporate and nonpro t groups. Fleur frequently provides facilitation for board retreats, staff trainings, off-site workshops with a focus on team building, emotional intelligence, social justice, experiential education, equity trainings, and community development. Fleur has also worked in youth development for over 20 years. She worked with Seattle Girls’ School for  ve years, a middle school based on anti-bias curriculum, and in 2000 co-founded Skate Like a Girl, which now has three chapters in Seattle, Portland, and San Francisco.
David LaSarte-Meeks is a member of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe and has spent his career advocating for Native American issues in a variety of roles. Since graduating with a dual JD/ MBA from Stanford University, he has worked as an attorney or executive manager directly for Tribes, inter- Tribal organizations, Indian law  rms, and Tribal enterprises in Arizona, Idaho, and Washington. David has recently joined the Northwest Justice Project as a Senior Attorney in the Native American Unit.
Lindy Laurence is a paralegal and project manager with Volunteer Legal Services in Pierce County, where she brings her prior business experience at successful entrepreneurial startups and growth companies to the legal  eld, along with her passion to help the most vulnerable people in our communities get access to the legal help they need. Lindy is especially committed to serving the civil legal needs of incarcerated people. She sees daily how life-changing effective legal help can be and is convinced that attorneys are the real-life superheroes in our society. Lindy spends much of her time serving on the Access to Justice Board. Lindy has been admitted to the University of Washington School of Law and looks forward to being part of the Class of 2020.
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